10 Classic European Sports Cars We’d Pay A Fortune For

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Buying a classic European sports car will never be a cheap endeavor, but there are still some great bargains out there. However, there are also many cars that are the exact opposite, so expensive that only the wealthiest collectors could afford to buy one. Cars like the McLaren F1 and Aston Martin DBR1 have seen their prices soar to astronomical figures, measured in the tens of millions and worth more money than most of us will ever see.

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It’s debatable whether cars like this are actually worth their sky-high valuations, or whether they’re just victims of an ultra-rich elite who are constantly trying to outdo themselves by overpaying for things. However, all dear Europeans classic is potentially too expensive. Some of them are just as expensive as they deserve, their place in automotive history more than justifying their asking prices. To put it simply, they are very expensive, but they are worth every penny.

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Porsche 959


1987 Porsche 959 Comfort
Via Mecum

One of Porsche’s rarest and most sought-after sports cars, the 959 was produced between 1986 and 1993, briefly becoming the world’s fastest street-legal production car in its debut. It was one of the first high-performance cars with all-wheel drive, mainly thanks to the company’s intention to enter the car in Group B rallying.


1987 Porsche 959 Comfort
Via Mecum

By the time Porsche had ensured the 959 met World Rally Championship homologation standards, Group B had been canceled due to a number of fatal crashes in the sport. Porsche ended up building around 340 examples of the car, and today these cars are very rarely offered for public sale.

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Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale


Stradale
Via: Wsupercars

The Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is the road version of the Tipo 33 racing car, and only a few differences exist between the two. Only 18 examples were made, making it one of the rarest Alfas of all time.

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Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale
Via Wsupercars

They are considered by some to be one of the first true supercars, as their performance was unlike anything else available in a road-legal car at the time. There is no record of 33 Stradales being offered for public sale in the past decade, so it is impossible to estimate their value, although it is likely to be in the tens of millions of dollars.

8
BMW M1


1980 BMW M1 AHG
Via Mecum

BMW’s only real supercar is the M1, which, despite its cult status today, was a huge financial headache for the company when it launched. Development of the car overshot significantly, and BMW raised the price of the car in an attempt to recoup some of its costs.


1980 BMW M1 AHG
Via Mecum

Buyers just weren’t interested, and the company only sold around 450 units of the M1 before pulling it from sale just three years after its launch. The company didn’t make any more production mid-engine sports cars until the i8 was launched in 2013.

7
Ferrari F40


Ferrari F40
By sydney

Arguably one of the most legendary Ferraris of all time, the F40 was originally a passion project that eventually got the green light from corporate backers to enter development. Over 1,300 examples of the car ended up being produced, with LM and Competizione racing versions also made.


Ferrari F40
ViaFerrari

Buying one today will cost around a million dollars, although copies have sold for considerably less if in poor condition. The F40 is the second entry in a line of flagship models from Ferrari, the most recent of which is the LaFerrari.

6
Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK GTR


Mercedes CLK GTR Super Sport
Via TheHorsepowerHunter/YouTube

It’s had the term “modern classic” for quite some time now, but in fact the Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK GTR is now old enough to qualify as a classic by most definitions. It turns 25 this year, but its performance is still sharp enough to take on many modern supercars.

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Mercedes CLK GTR Super Sport
On Supercars.net

The CLK GTR was designed as a homologation requirement for the FIA ​​GT Championship, specifically to allow Mercedes to race at Le Mans. The car wasn’t as successful in French endurance racing as the team had hoped, but at least enthusiasts got to see the creation of one of Mercedes-Benz’s most road-legal cars. most exciting ever made.

5
Lancia 037 Stradale


Lancia 037 Stradale
Via BH Auction

Another Group B rally special, the 037 was produced between 1982 and 1984 to give Lancia access to the World Rally Championship. It’s a barely legal road car that’s mostly identical to its competition sibling, with virtually no luxury for the driver.


Lancia 037 Stradale
Via BH Auction

It is believed that around 200 road-going examples were produced to meet WRC requirements. In competition, the car established itself as a force to be reckoned with despite fierce competition, winning five events in the 1983 season and one in 1984.

4
Porsche 962


Porsche 962C 1986
On Supercars.net

Most race cars are outdated after a year or two of competing on the circuit, but the Porsche 962 proved that wasn’t always the case. After winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans on its first outing in 1986 and again in 1987, it looked like the 962 would become one of the greatest competition cars of the 80s.


Porsche 962C 1986
On Supercars.net

But it wasn’t done yet, as a race-modified 962 under the Sauber team won the Le Mans title again eight years after the car’s debut, in 1994. Very few race cars can claim that kind longevity, especially during a race. as competitive as Le Mans. A few 962 chassis have been converted to be street legal, and buying one today will likely cost over a million dollars.

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Ferrari 288 GTO


Ferrari 288 GTO
Via Bonhams

The first of a line of flagship Ferraris and predecessor to the legendary F40, the 288 GTO almost never saw the light of day. Ferrari engineers were working on a prototype to take part in the Group B rally, but after the category was shut down it looked like the project was dead on its feet.


Ferrari 288 GTO
Via Bonhams

Nevertheless, Enzo Ferrari was keen to see what he could do with the car, working on it with a few members of his teams in the evenings and at weekends. Eventually it was given the go-ahead for production, becoming the world’s fastest production car in 1984.

2
Jaguar XJ220


XJ220 front 3/4 view
Via FavCars

It may not have forged the same worldwide reputation as the Ferrari F40 or the Porsche 959, but the Jaguar XJ220 was just as forward-thinking as the two when it debuted in 1992. Like many cars from now iconic sports, buyers were initially put off by the Jag’s high asking price, and only 282 examples were produced.


XJ220 rear 3/4 view
Via FavCars

Despite the name, the XJ220’s official top speed is not 220mph, but rather 217mph, as Jaguar was unable to meet its original target. Today, it’s one of the cheapest flagship supercars of its day to buy, selling for around $500,000. It’s still more than most of us will ever be able to afford, but a bargain compared to some Ferraris and Porsches of the time.

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Lamborghini Miura SV


Lamborghini Miura SV
By Silverstone Auctions

The Miura was the car that really propelled Lamborghini to worldwide fame, becoming a hit with wealthy collectors and Hollywood celebrities. The SV was the lightest and fastest version of the car, and it is incredibly rare, with only 150 examples said to have been made.


Lamborghini Miura SV
By Silverstone Auctions

A “normal” Miura will cost around $2 million to buy today, and the only SV on sale at the time of writing is only at asking price. However, that price will likely be double that of a base Miura, if not more. It’s a jaw-dropping number, but it seems very fitting for what many people still consider to be the greatest Lamborghini ever made.


Ferrari Enzo front view on the track

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